Research with students and young professionals 

 
 Crew member Ian Lively removes a queen Bombus vosnesenskii from an early season trap in southwestern Oregon (2016)

Crew member Ian Lively removes a queen Bombus vosnesenskii from an early season trap in southwestern Oregon (2016)

Examples of mentoring experience

  • Worked individually with students in a graduate-level seminar course to build scientific presentation skills
  • Worked with several high school and undergraduate-level students on projects related to pollinator research in the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica
  • Supervised six recent graduates to collect data on bee populations and habitat characteristics in post-wildfire mixed conifer forest of Southwest Oregon
  • Mentoring two undergraduate students doing research at Oregon State University

Course design and instruction

 DESIGNED AND TAUGHT FES 399 FOR OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY ECAMPUS

DESIGNED AND TAUGHT FES 399 FOR OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY ECAMPUS

Course description:

This course will familiarize students with ways to combine the problem-solving approaches of different fields of science to address complex environmental problems. Scientists, decision-makers, and stakeholders often work separately and focus on different social or ecological aspects of such problems. This can result in decisions that prioritize one or few components of the system, which can lead to unexpected feedbacks and new problems. This class explores concepts and tools used to create more robust analyses of complex environmental problems that include both social and ecological components. Case studies will focus on specific problems, to give students practical exposure to how integrating different scientific perspectives can lead to new and more effective decisions. The course will begin with an overview of the concept of interdisciplinary study, then focus specifically on the social-ecological systems framework and interdisciplinary tools used to study social-ecological systems. We will use existing datasets for hands-on experience with these tools.

Measurable learning outcomes:

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

·        Describe the difference between disciplinary and interdisciplinary research approaches, and understand the pros and cons of these approaches for studying social and ecological problems

·        Create a conceptual model of an interdisciplinary problem

·        Develop an interdisciplinary problem statement from a case study

·        Identify interdisciplinary challenges that arise from differences in different fields of science (such as different scales of analysis and different use of vocabulary)

·        Use social network analysis to link social and ecological datasets

·        Use spatially-explicit methods to link social and ecological datasets

·        Write an interdisciplinary research proposal that applies the skills and tools learned throughout the course

 

 Student group for mangrove monitoring project for CSUCI course in Costa Rica

Student group for mangrove monitoring project for CSUCI course in Costa Rica

Assisted with course instruction for California State University Channel Islands, Great Basin Institute, and Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica field course in Las Baulas National Park

Responsibilities:

  • Instructing students with background information on conservation in Costa Rica
  • Designing feasible methods for student monitoring of the beach vegetation curtain
  • Training students in forestry techniques for monitoring mangrove forests
  • Maintaining a safe working environment
  • Assisting with course organization
  • Organizing an invited speaker presentation